Last updated on: 1/29/2010 | Author: ProCon.org

American Academy of Pediatrics Biography

Position:
Pro to the question "Should Any Vaccines Be Required for Children?"
Reasoning:

“Vaccines save lives and protect against the spread of disease. If you decide not to immunize your child, you put your child at risk. Your child could catch a disease that is dangerous or deadly. Getting vaccinated is much better than getting the disease.

Your pediatrician knows that you care about your child’s health and safety. That’s why you need to get all the scientific facts from a medical professional you can trust before making any decisions based on stories you may have seen or heard on TV, the Internet, or from other parents…

Vaccines work. They have kept children healthy and have saved millions of lives for more than 50 years. Most childhood vaccines are 90% to 99% effective in preventing disease…

Vaccines are safe. All vaccines must be tested by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA will not let a vaccine be given unless it has been proven to be safe and to work well in children…

Vaccines are necessary… in many parts of the world many vaccine-preventable diseases are still common. Since diseases may be brought into the United States by Americans who travel abroad or from people visiting areas with current disease outbreaks it’s important that your children are vaccinated.”

“Vaccine Safety: The Facts,” aap.org (accessed Jan. 22, 2010)

Theoretical Expertise Ranking:
Organizations/VIPs/Others
Individuals and organizations that do not fit into the other star categories.
Description:

“The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and its member pediatricians dedicate their efforts and resources to the health, safety and well-being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults…

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) was founded in June 1930 by 35 pediatricians who met in Detroit in response to the need for an independent pediatric forum to address children’s needs…

One of the AAP’s major activities is to further the professional education of its members. Continuing education courses, annual scientific meetings, seminars, publications and statements from committees, councils, and sections form the basis of a continuing postgraduate educational program…

The AAP publishes Pediatrics, its monthly scientific journal; Pediatrics in Review, its continuing education journal; and its membership news magazine, AAP News. It also publishes manuals on such topics as infectious diseases and school health. In its public education efforts, the AAP produces patient education brochures and a series of child care books written by AAP members.

The AAP executes original research in social, economic and behavioral areas and promotes funding of research. It maintains a Washington, DC office to ensure that children’s health needs are taken into consideration as legislation and public policy are developed. The AAP’s state advocacy staff provides assistance to chapters, promoting issues such as child safety legislation and Medicaid policies that increase access to care for low-income children.”

“AAP Fact Sheet,” aap.org (accessed Jan. 29, 2010)

Mission:

“The mission of the AAP is to attain optimal physical, mental, and social health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. To accomplish this mission, the AAP shall support the professional needs of its members.”

“AAP Fact Sheet,” aap.org (accessed Jan. 29, 2010)

Other:
501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation